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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 15, 2011 8:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Bear's NY Times obituary


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/us/15stanley.html?_r=1&;hp

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Poster: high flow Date: Mar 15, 2011 2:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Thanks for the link. I never ingested LSD because I never knew where it came from and what was in it. Owsley states the same reason for learning to produce LSD. I was not quite as resourceful....I just ate mushrooms instead.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Mar 16, 2011 1:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary - Relix article

Shortly after I joined up with the Dead as soundman in February 1966, they decided to pack up and follow Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters to Los Angeles. They considered themselves to be the official Acid Test band, and felt the show depended on their being there. I followed, although I was not as convinced it was such a great idea.

We arrived in L.A, a motley group of about ten or 12 people with no place to stay and very little money to live on. We were helped out of our critical needs for shelter by a real estate agent one of the Pranksters knew or had met, and settled into a large pink house in the area called the Watts, right next to a brothel. We had nowhere else to practice, so we set up in the living room. Needless to say, the loud and often weird music upset the hookers next door- who felt it was driving business away- so they called the cops every time we got going. Cops do not respond with alacrity to such calls, so we did get in a bit of practice before a knock on the door and a uniform led to us turning down (in our terms, down was the same as off).

The Acid Test was the first reason for us to be there, but I looked at it as a great way for the musicians to do a lot of practice and for me to learn what it meant to be a soundman. So practice we did, even though it caused a bit of friction with out next-door neighbors. I wondered about the close relations their must have had with the cops as we were always pulling up pot seedlings from the strip of grass between the houses (their customers were in the habit of tossing seeds out the upstairs windows while rolling joints).

Once Barbara, a friend, made us up a bath of her specialty: B Toklas’ original recipe marijuana brownies. Unaware of what was happening, she had just gotten out of her car and was walking up the path to the door when a cop stopped her on one of their visits to get us to turn down the music. “What’s in the bag?” asked the cop. Not flustered in the least, Barbara answered, “Homemade brownies, would you like one?” The cop declined her generous offer and let her pass. I often wondered what would have happened if he had taken her up. The recipe used broken up, whole bud mixed up into a paste with dates, nuts, figs, and other fruits plus a touch of rum or brandy- sort of like a fruitcake mix, but not actually cooked. It had a distinctive taste, to say the least, and you got well and truly stoned.

It was at a practice session in the house in Watts that I saw sound coming out as interacting waves of color from the loudspeaker. Naturally, I had ingested some kind of psychedelic, matters not which, because I have never repeated the experience. It definitely taught me a huge amount about the real way sound propagates in the air- which is nothing like the ideas still current in the sound reproduction/reinforcement field. This happy one-off “accident” is why my sound ideas (for instance, the Wall of Sound) are so strange and work so well- and have never been replicated by others.

The band played several Acid Tests as well as at least two non-Prankster shows, one at the Hollywood Trooper’s Hall and the other one at a small venue called Danish Hall upstairs over a block of stores in L.A. We had some pretty interesting times in L.A.- The Watts AT was as strange as they come and the final one at the sound set on Pico Boulevard was stopped before midnight by the owner, who was rightfully freaked out by all the magic and weirdness.

After about three months we ran totally out of money and it was well and truly time to return home. During our “woodshedding” time in L.A., Rock Scully, our manager had been turning down offers of gigs from the various clubs in the Bay Area because not enough money was on offer. The prices the band worked for when we left was only $125/night, which works out to $25 (gas money and a sandwich) for each musician, leaving no money for the soundman or roadies. Most bands had neither one at that stage in their career. The Dead had begun as a band only about ten months earlier and had owned the name Grateful Dead for just four months. Finally an offer in the princely sum of $375 came for a gig at the Longshoreman’s Hall with several other bands, including the Oakland band Loading Zone. Just in time, as the old saying goes, and we accepted it with thanks.

We returned home, well practiced and confident. Things continued to improve after that.

http://www.relix.com/features/2011/03/14/southern-california-sojourn-by-owsley-bear-stanley

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Poster: Capt. Cook Date: Mar 16, 2011 3:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Kid Charlemagne! His position as chemist to the band is unequaled, and beyond historic. The fact he moved to Australia and died in a car accident is almost too perfect a script to write. He was the consumate Dr. Roberts - with ideas on sound that are still beyond today... I wonder what a toll the acid really did on his long term brain function... hard to go back after such a journey...

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 16, 2011 6:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Mareeba: that's where I spent a week looking for water pythons, frilled lizards and leaf tailed geckos last year.

Interesting....

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Poster: snow_and_rain Date: Mar 15, 2011 9:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Thanks.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 15, 2011 11:04am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Owsley even got a mention on the morning news on the radio here, which actually surprised me a little I have to admit. But they did insist on pronouncing his name as OH-sley - I always thought it was OW-sley. Am I wrong about that? I'm basing my assumption on Bless Its Pointed Little Head ("turn out the lights or we'll send Owsley to get you").

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Mar 15, 2011 1:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

I had never heard pronounced until recently, I just assumed it was the way you did as well. I heard Pete Townsend say it in a documentary from 1973 about Jimi Hendrix. He also went with Ow not Oh. He was talking about his product not the Bear himself.

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Poster: DeadATL Date: Mar 16, 2011 6:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

A friend just forwarded this note:

YOU FOOLS! OWSLEY LIVES!

He faked his death to go underground. He has been off the grid for so long he cannot be tracked.

RIGHT NOW HE IS ON Bill Kreutzmann's boat headed back to the USA to sneak in.

He is on a mission to bring back the "OWSLEY". Just wait, in about a year it will be EVERYWHERE.

OWSLEY LIVES!!!!

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 16, 2011 6:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

I've always thought it interesting that there were never (as far as I know?) rumors that Jerry was not really dead, but in hiding somewhere.

I mean think about it :) Dying in rehab would be a good cover, no?

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Poster: Skobud Date: Mar 15, 2011 11:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Nice.

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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Mar 15, 2011 10:22am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear's NY Times obituary

Not too bad, really.